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Burgess Buttercup Winter Squash Seeds For Planting (Cucurbita pepo)

1 total reviews

Regular price $3.99

as low as $2.99

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25 Seeds Per Packet
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How much is shipping?

Shipping is only $2.99! This is a flat rate fee for all seed orders within the United States. We do not ship out of the United States to Canada or Mexico, or anywhere abroad.

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Are your seeds heirlooms?

Absolutely! 99% of all seeds on our site are heirlooms (which are defined as true to the parent) and are passed down from generation to generation. Many were bred for quality of flavor, productivity, hardiness and adaptability.

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Are your seeds Non-GMO?

Yes! We will never knowingly sell GMO based seed products. Hardly any exist in the market anyways, but if they do, you can trust that we will steer clear of them.

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Are your seeds organic?

In short, no... But we are firm believers that "organic" is how YOU decide to grow things. You can still organically grow your own produce with, non certified seeds because there is no difference aside from the price.

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Are your seeds treated?

Nope! We never knowingly purchases treated seed products. We also do not treat any of our seeds with substances such as neonicotinoid or thyram.

About

Reviews

Description

Grow a garden filled with Burgess Buttercup Squash, from freshly harvested Cucurbita pepo seeds. Burgess Buttercup produces a fine-grained, sweet flesh, which is stringless, making it perfect for baking and steaming. The hard outer skin is dark green in color, while the inner flesh is a golden yellow / orange. Burgess Buttercup Squash plants will grow outwards, taking up plenty of gardening space. It is recommended that you sow these seeds in a large area, to accommodate a 6 foot vine. Each vine will produce up to 4 to 5 fruits and the fruits can be harvested in about 100 days.

Squash plants, like pumpkins are grown as annual plants. Annuals will grow quickly, producing vines, leaves and fruits through the warm months of summer. After harvesting the Squash from its vines, the plants will wilt soon after, with the first frost. Squash plants can be regrown the following season if you manage to save some of the seeds within the Squash itself.

Burgess Buttercup is one of the many varieties of Squash that we have to offer. Check out our Squash category for a wide variety of other options available. You might also be interested in our Pumpkins and Gourds as well.

What is the difference between Winter and Summer Squash?

First and foremost, Squash in general, both develop and produce fruits in the summer months, up until early Autumn. The main difference is based upon harvesting, consumption, as well as the use for your Summer or Winter Squash. Summer Squash is best enjoyed when harvested early, while its fruits have a tender skin. While Winter Squash will take up to 50 to 60 percent longer to develop and can be harvest later in the season. Winter Squash fruits, such as Table Queen, Burgess Buttercup, Sweet Meat and Waltham Butternut, will have a thicker outer skin and a sweeter inner flesh, making them perfect for baking and stuffing. Summer Squash, such as Prolific Straightneck, Crookneck, Early white Scallop and Zucchini, are best consumed raw, steamed or cooked.

Sowing The Seed

Squash seeds aren't too fond of being transplanted and are best sown directly in the garden, after all danger of frost has passed. Begin by clearing your sowing area of all unwanted plant life and other obnoxious weeds that you find. Sow the seeds at a depth of 1" under topsoil, in hills which can be raised 8 inches tall. Check "Germination and Growth" for additional information on spacing.

Growing Conditions

Squash plants will enjoy the heat of summer and thrive in temperatures that are above 65F. Since Squash is a heavy feeder, the soil should be rich in organic matter, but will also need to be well drained. To improve drainage, it is recommended to add a light compost to any hard, compacted soil in the sowing area. This will prevent the roots from rotting. Water the seeds daily with a mild setting so that the seeds and seedlings are kept moist until germination occurs. Avoid overwatering.

Germination & Growth

Squash seeds will begin to sprout open in roughly 7 to 14 days after sowing. The plants will grow to a mature height of 1 to 2 feet tall and can take up 6 feet of garden space. These plants will need a large area to grow outwards and can be spaced by hills or mounds of dirt, rather than rows. As explained above mounds should be 18 to 24 inches wide and at least 8 inches tall. Space each mound at least 6 feet apart from one another. When sprouts become visible, direct the vines outwards towards areas that do not contain other plant life.

Harvesting Burgess Buttercup Squash

When your vines start to establish Squash, be sure to place straw under the fruits to prevent them from touching the bare ground beneath, as this can prevent rotting. Your Burgess Buttercup Squash will be ready for harvesting in roughly 100 days after the skin becomes hard and dark green. Cut the stems at least 2 to 3 inches from the actual fruits, otherwise the fruits will rot.

Winter Squash, such as Burgess Buttercup can be stored for weeks on in, if they are kept in a cool location. Handle the fruits with care to avoid denting or bruising, as this can cause the fruits to rot prematurely.